Timetable

A990.CLOCK.16SBB_C Picture from www.mondaine.com

In Switzerland I always have the impression to be overwhelmed by the time! Or at least more than anywhere else.

There is a timetable for everything, and everyone knows by heart the useful schedule: trains, buses, shops being among the most common. In the village where I live with my family you need to rely on these schedules…

Aaah!
How nice it would be living in a big city (again), where you just know that there will be a tram soon! And not just the 7:24 or 7:54 buses and then “the nothing”!!

Aaah!
How nice it would be living in a big city (again), where you would have shops opening at normal times and until quite late in the night! And not shops opening half an hour earlier than usual on Saturdays (yes, earlier!), when you should be supposed to sleep at least half an hour more than on the weekdays!!

Stamps…discos…IKEA

2014-12-30 00.26.10
Dear Reader,
this post is something between a nostalgic view of the past and the present reality in Switzerland.

Discos: When I was young, some 20-25 years ago, at the entrance to the discos and clubs, they always used to stamp your hand with a stamp quite difficult to take out, which was useful as ticket to re-enter after some minutes of fresh air outside.

IKEA: Yesterday, during the procedures to leave 1 and half hour our elder daughter in the “children paradise”, the playground of IKEA, they stamped our hands with the same almost impossible to delete ink they were using in the discos in the 80’s and 90’s.

Switzerland on 29th December 2014: the “busiest” day of the year in the Confederation!
All the people were visiting IKEA in Spreitenbach (by the way the oldest IKEA in Switzerland), a small town in Argovia at the border with Zurich canton, probably only famous for IKEA and some other “equally full of people” shopping malls!

Conclusion: when it becomes busy and crowdy…somehow your hands will be definitely stamped!

Grüezi mitenand!

I was at the butcher’s waiting for my turn. A man entered the shop loudly and clearly spelling an echoing “Grüezi mitenand” (Literally: hello together)! Swiss normally greet all the people present in the place they arrive. Unknown people mostly…so you can imagine how heartily the “hello” is…